Wednesday, February 27, 2013

My Scrapbook Process: Navy As A Neutral

The assignment from Get It Scrapped!: Make a page in which Navy is your neutral. Hmm. Interesting challenge. Here's how I tackled it.



Step #1. Pulled navy patterned paper from my stash. Will I use a white or cream background? What other colors will I add?



Step #2. Selected photos, wrote the journaling. Now I know I am definitely going with white because of the photo background. The pictures also give me some other color options.

Step #3. Pulled more patterned paper. Time to start assembling the page.


Step #4. Decided on this subtle tone-on-tone dot navy background, plus 4 more patterned papers: larger circles, stripes, chevron, to give me a variety of patterns.



Step #5. Title on the photo - love doing that when I can! My journaling strips show up the best on the navy, but stick out. I'll need to make that work somehow...



Embellished simply in three spots on the page to form a visual triangle. I also pop dotted some images on the large circle patterned paper for interest. Not a super complicated page, but I'm happy with the results.

There's more layouts in the article here, plus a list of reasons to use neutrals on your scrapbook page. Did you know that navy is considered a trendy neutral these days? 








Monday, February 25, 2013

Two Page Tuesday: The 8-Photo Scrapbook Layout


The assignment from Get It Scrapped!: Make a 2-page layout with 8 photos. My page is about our spring break trip to Springfield, Illinois, focusing on the Old State Capitol and Lincoln's Tomb.

Page 1: The layout begins with a focal point photo of Lincoln. The placement under the title and double matting all serve to draw the eye to this photo. With the theme firmly established, next comes a vertical strip of 3 smaller photos.


Page 2: A grouping of 4 photos and the journaling complete this two-page spread. Can you spot the ways I tied the pages together?


Both Pages: The turquoise polka dot and red strips of patterned papers run horizontally across the entire layout to promote flow across the two pages. Stars, kraft cardstock, and black as an accent color are repeated on both pages to further unify the double layout.

You can see more examples of 8-photo layouts in the article here. Plenty of ideas and inspiration!





Wednesday, February 20, 2013

My Scrapbook Process: Mixing Black & White with Color Photos

The assignment from Get It Scrapped!Make a page with a mix of black & white and color photos. This page is about snatching my husband's camera to get a few pictures of him. Here's how it came together.


Photo Placement: matting the focal point photo and placing it in a "sweet spot" on the page


Borders: lighter, thinner at the top; darker, thicker at the bottom for weight
Washi Tape and Title: keeping color on color and neutral with neutral


Tweaking: finishing the top border with banners and stitching; changing the washi to patterned paper that matches the banners

Final Touches: finishing the visual triangle of color; adding journaling


Collection Featured: Studio Calico Darling Dear
I wanted the page to be more about my husband and less about the fall setting, so I used the black and white close-up as the focal point and neutral colors for my title and journaling. The supporting pictures and embellishment clusters form a visual triangle and add pops of color to a mostly neutral layout.

Why would you want to mix black & white photos with color photos? How about:
  • To add variety to a collection of portraits (like I did with my page)
  • To emphasize one photo over several others
  • To simplify busy photos
  • To mix old photos with more recent ones

These reasons and more are covered in the rest of the article right here. Hope you'll check it out and give it a try!











Monday, February 18, 2013

Scrapping Small Pleasures


The assignment from Get It Scrapped! - Scrapbook a small indulgence or pleasure that you give yourself. This page is about the enjoyment of making friends with almost any cat I meet - they just like me! 


Collection Featured: Pebbles Seen & Noted

My husband took these photos while we were on vacation out of state, totally proving my point. For a layout about a simple pleasure, I chose a simple design scheme in happy colors.



Debbie Hodge describes this assignment perfectly:
"Scrapbooking a little personal indulgence that you give yourself is FUN. First: you indulge. Second: you take a fun photo of that indulgence. Third, you relive the indulgence as you spend time with its memory making a page that doesn’t require getting lots of photos onto the canvas or coming up with extensive journaling or even a title with deep meaning."
The rest of the article can be found here. Are you ready to consider this your Monday challenge? 


Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Doing Dimension Well

A recent assignment from Get It Scrapped!Make a page on which you've paid attention to and done extra work to get dimension onto the page. Okay, I'm up for that. This layout is about a fascinating historic home we discovered along Lake Michigan. Can you spot the ways I played with dimension? (there's a list below)


  • selected a subtle tone-on-tone pattern background paper
  • inked edges and layered paper 
  • matted and pop dotted the photo
  • chose woodgrain Thickers 
  • adhered stickers with raised adhesive 
  • placed the heart behind negative space 
  • sprinkled little Twinkle Goosebumps 
  • finished with hand stitching

When doing this kind of work, I strive to achieve a balance between flat and dimensional elements, making sure they overlap by layering on top and tucking behind. That's my example, but there are plenty more in the article here

Debbie Hodge has added a new element to Masterful Scrapbook Design, the membership site. Now the guest teachers not only sit down for hour-long individual interviews, they also spend another hour online with you taking a look at your pages and even providing feedback if you want. Here is a short video excerpt. One of my layouts is critiqued, it's the last one on the video.  I hope you'll go check this out!

Monday, February 11, 2013

Typography As A Design Element

I'm humming along in my Guided Study Critique Class, working hard and enjoying every minute. Our week 3 topic was to consider how we use type and text on our scrapbook layouts. I know I've covered this before, but I love to use a long title as a design element. Here's a few past examples, then one of the pages I submitted for class.
A longer title allows you to add color and focus to a layout, and becomes a major design element. All you need is a nice stash of various alphabets. I enjoy laying out a longer title, deciding which words to emphasize and how much space to use on the page. It's kind of like solving a puzzle.
A long title can also double as the journaling. These short phrases say all I need on this page.


For my class assignment, this layout contains a single sentence that serves as title, journaling and major design element. It also captures the dry humor of my brother in-law perfectly!

So whether it's long, one word, or something in between, do you consider the impact of your titles? I know I'm often tempted to just slap on some black Thickers and call it done. Nothing wrong with that, but I am happy with the results when I take a little more time to consider and execute a well-designed title. Consider it your Monday challenge!

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Go To Designs: The Shelf

Another Go To Design I turn to quite often is the shelf. What exactly do I mean by a shelf? It's a horizontal border that does not span the full width of the page, used to showcase key elements. Here's some examples:


This shelf is made up of three patterned papers that are border punched and embellished. The photo placed on the shelf becomes the center of attention. A layer of mist adds subtle dimension. This photo is so old, it is an actual polaroid!


In this example, I've use the shelf to place a photo and title on top, and hang a photo and the journaling below. Grouping key elements in this manner creates a sense of unity.



This is one of my favorite shelf pages. I used a layering technique with paper scraps and tags, and I like the extra dimension the strings and brads bring to the page. I try to keep the space around the shelf fairly clean. This one uses white space quite literally!


Collection Featured: Crate Paper Fourteen

Here is my most recent shelf page, where I put my Silhouette to good work. The shelf design is useful when you have one large landscape photo or a few square photos you want to highlight. You can vary the placement on the page: to the right, to the left, or smack dab in the middle.


I tend to begin my shelf pages with three layered borders in a variety of sizes and colors, then add a few bits and pieces. The hearts placed near the title and journaling draw attention to these elements, and create diagonal flow.



So are you ready to give the shelf a whirl? Or maybe this is already a Go To Design in your arsenal? It's very handy and versatile!

Monday, February 4, 2013

My Scrapbook Process: 5 Easy Steps

Today I have another Peek at My Process for your blog surfing enjoyment. Here's how a recent layout came together. My son and his cousins in their Hawaiian shirts from years back was the inspiration for this page. 


Step #1. Neutral Colors for the Background: gray cardstock, photo matted on white cardstock, a Silhouette cut background.
Step #2. Accent Colors: patterned paper for a border and filling in some of the Silhouette cut. Title and journaling layered on top. Time to Tweak!
Step #3. First Tweak: added a bright yellow to the border, which makes the whole page happier.
Step #4. Second Tweak: embellished around two sides of the photo to draw attention to it.
Step #5. Third Tweak: added dimension with buttons; going tone-on-tone is a nice finishing touch without overwhelming the page.


Collection Featured: Pebbles Seen & Noted
Here is the finished layout. Unlike many of my pages, this one came together quickly, without too many changes or detours. I love it when that happens! I also love the opportunity to use flower patterns on a boy page, and those shirts asked for it!